Ideal Chamber Music-Making from the Zemlinsky Quartet
30/05/2017
United KingdomUnited, Wigmore Hall London, 29.5.2017. (CS)
Zemlinsky – String Quartet No.1 in A Op.4
Janáček – Mládí (arr. for string quartet by Kryštof Mařatka)

Alexander Zemlinsky wrote four string quartets but they are only rarely heard in the concert hall (though have been some excellent recent recordings by the Escher and Brodsky Quartets to add to earlier discs by the LaSalle, Artis and Schoenberg Quartets). In 2011, the Zemlinsky Quartet released a Praga Digitals disc, presenting the composer’s second and fourth quartets and the Two Movements for String Quartet of 1927 (PRDDSD/250277) and it was good to be hear the ensemble play their namesake’s First Quartet at this Wigmore Hall lunchtime recital, for they reminded us what a bounty of musical ideas the quartets contain, and how strikingly they reveal the composer’s fecund imagination and adroit technique. The Zemlinsky Quartet play with a rich Romantic warmth perfectly suited to Zemlinsky’s post-Brahmsian idiom. But, while the composer was greatly influenced by Brahms – who was President of the Gesellschaft. der Musikfreunde Konservatorium when Zemlinsky was a young student of piano and composition – the First Quartet, written in 1896, also shows how far Zemlinsky had moved towards the harmonic and rhythmic freedom which would characterise the music of the early years of the twentieth century.

The individual parts came together in gloriously ‘thick’ swathes of sound at climactic moments, but the prevailing texture was one of busy contrapuntal argument and development with all voices equally insistent. The Zemlinsky Quartet sustained an impressive lucidity allowing us to appreciate the composer’s roving invention: how far he pushes the boundaries that Brahms had begun to nudge with his asymmetrical phrasing and irregular, cross-pulse rhythms. Consequently, there was a lovely freedom to the Zemlinsky’s account. At times, it felt as if the music could simply burst through the bar-lines or tonal structure, but a judicious brake was always applied just in time, while never lessening the prevailing verve. The lovely bright sound at the start of the Allegro con fuoco was well-blended but each of the voices spoke equally and clearly. This is melodious, elated music; one imagines strolling along a boulevard in fin de siècle Vienna and hearing snatches of song and dance in a carefree medley from open windows of homes and halls. Vladimír Fortin’s ringing cello pizzicatos gave additional impetus to the asymmetrical rhythms. The easy communication between the players was engaging, as during the more peaceful episode towards the end of the development section, when the gently pulsing, syncopated inner voices supported a lyrical exchange between the first violin and cello

The cracking dissonant chords that precede a general pause just before the coda seemed to hint at the chromatic unrest which troubles the central section of Allegretto which follows. The opening was sunny and light, however, a tender folk melody which lilted nonchalantly along. But, the Zemlinsky Quartet embraced the gritty harshness of the central wild dance with its exuberant fragments and ever-changing textures. Zemlinsky’s titular instruction ‘Breit und Kraftig’ is just right for the third movement, and the Quartet did indeed surge broadly and powerfully through the sustained lines. Fortin’s cello repeatedly roved to the depths in slithering descents as the ideas lunged forward furiously, though there was a lovely retreat for the more settled second theme and the Romantic suspensions of the closing bars arrived at a consoling point of rest. The upper strings’ rising flourish at the start of the Vivace con fuoco fizzed with Straussian high-spirits and despite the density of the material – the music seems almost symphonic in dimension at times – the movement retained an air of vivacious enthusiasm.

The Quartet moved from Vienna back to their home patch for the second work on the programme, an intriguing arrangement of Janáček’s wind sextet Mládí (Youth), the four movements of which represent memories from the composer’s childhood. Despite its general light-heartedness, this music is fiendishly difficult, written one might imagine to test the technical expertise of the original woodwind players, and I confess that I had my doubts about how well the work would translate to the string quartet medium. However, from the opening bars of the Andante it was clear that Kryštof Mařatka had ‘re-produced’ the idiomatic sound-world of Janáček’s writing for strings with astonishing credibility – the arrangement is practically a third string quartet for the composer’s canon. Here are the chuntering and driving ostinato motifs, the vigorous folk snatches, the wistful interjections, the insistent yearning which underpins the surface energy which are so familiar.

The cello’s lament at the start of the Moderato drooped with sentiment, the dark colour and repeating fourth-based motif seeming to create a particularly ‘Czech’ feeling. This motif was gradually but dynamically transformed into a fierce, lambasting retort, before the lament returned, played with wonderful projection and warmth by viola player Petr Holman, creating an almost Dvořákian nostalgia. Janáček drew the material for his third movement from the 1923 March of the Bluebells for piccolo, ‘bells’ and tambourine (or piano). The piccolo’s chirping and twittering was cleanly and brightly articulated here by leader František Souček; as he climbed ever higher his E-string seemed to shine more glossily, and the intonation was perfect. This lively movement was a portrait of grace, but the vivaciousness returned for the finale, Con moto, which accelerated in breakneck fashion – the flutter-tonguing of the original become a furious tremolando! – pausing only momentarily for Holman’s pensive interpolation just before the close.

This concert was a perfect union of intimate interaction between four musicians – real chamber music – and joyful, often playful, ‘performance’, with all four members of the Zemlinsky Quartet frequently turning their instruments towards the audience, to communicate and share their music-making. This was a lovely lunchtime concert which will certainly send me seeking further performances of Zemlinsky’s chamber music and by the Quartet who have taken the composer’s name.

Claire Seymour

back to top
The Zemlinsky Quartet in London
London, Wigmore Hall, 29.5.2017
Dvorak Society Newsletter
Zemlinsky – String Quartet No.1 in A Op.4
Janáček – Mládí (arr. for string quartet by Kryštof Mařatka)

There are so many top class string quartet ensembles emanating from the Czech Republic that it is difficult to keep up with them all. It was with particular pleasure that I noticed billed in Radio Times a live broadcast from the Wigmore Hall to be given by the Zemlinsky Quartet on Monday 29 May as part of Radio 3’s Lunchtime Concerts series. I recall hearing this ensemble some time ago when they performed the Third Quartet of Martinů (plus Viktor Kalabis’ Third Quartet) during the 2004 Martinů Festival in Prague, and their live recording of this piece appeared on the Martinů Foundation’s special CD (Promo NBM 09). At that time they informed me that they were planning to change their name from Penguin Quartet (named after their toy mascot) to their present title - Zemlinsky Quartet, since this was a composer they had decided to champion. The opportunity to hear them perform live one of Zemlinsky’s quartets, together with Janáček’s Mládí in a novel arrangement for string quartet, was too good to miss and we duly booked tickets for this special event. Considering that it was on a Bank Holiday Monday with London seeming a little empty, the concert was well attended by a very international audience. For instance we found ourselves sitting next to the niece of the American harpsichordist Ralph Kirkpatrick, who had recently published a book about him and was on a visit from Boston, USA.

Zemlinsky’s First Quartet, Op. 4 turned out to be a rather sub- Brahmsian affair, but pleasant enough, and with such wonderfully balanced and euphonious playing from these Czech musicians, allied to perfect intonation, one would willingly listen to them playing even the least arresting of music. The Janáček provided the perfect foil. Here was music of exceptional originality and individuality and the artistic adaptation by Kryštof Mařatka of the original wind sextet made at the request of the Zemlinsky Quartet proved surprisingly successful. In effect, there are now three string quartets by the Moravian master available for performance, with Mládí positioned between the other two chronologically and stylistically. Janáček’s nostalgic “memories of youth”, as he called the piece, was played by the Zemlinskys with a zest that was not lacking poignant elements. To my mind, the only less than effective moment was when the first violin tries to imitate the piping of the piccolo in The March of the Bluebirds (third movement).

This splendid concert was rounded off with the quartet’s own very ingenious and entertaining arrangement of The Dance of the Comedians from Smetana’s Bartered Bride, given as an encore and played with near- gipsy abandonment. We spoke to the Zemlinskys afterwards and learned that they have recorded the complete quartets of Dvořák for Praga Digitals. To judge from the sample disc they very kindly presented to us, which contained the early Quartet in E minor Op. 80(27), their recordings capture all the qualities to be heard in their live performances and would unquestionably be well worth seeking out.
Patrick Lambert

back to top
Der Tiefpunkt ist der höchste Ton
Drei Meisterwerke der klassischen Musik für vier Könner: den helmbrechtser Kulturwelten trägt das Zemlinsky-Quartett grosse böhmische Kammermusik bei. Helmbrechts, 4.10.2016
www.frankenpost.de


Helmbrechts - Burian? Emil František Burian? Nie gehört? Keiner muss sich schämen, wenn ihm der Komponist dieses Namens nie unterkam. Einshlägige Handbücher geben als Lebensspanne des Tschechen die Jahre 1904 bis 1959 preis und betonen die Jazz-Elemente in seinen vielfach "ironischen", oft "experimentellen" Schöpfungen. Insofern passt er ins Gesamtbild der Helmbrechtser Kulturwelten, deren Programm sich afu die populäre Musik konzentriert. Freilich nicht nur- In die Johanniskirche lud Veranstalter Heinz König zu einem Abend mit Klassik der anspruchsvollsten Art, zu Kammermusik. Etwa hundert Zuhörer fanden sich ein und bewunderten vier Könner, die aus ihrer tschechischen Heimat drei Meisterwerke mitbrachten.

Sie bewunderten und beklatschten das Zemlinsky-Quartett. Schon mal gehört, den Namen? Kann gut sein: 2014 gaben sich die international konzertierenden, vielfach prämiierten Musiker aus Prag als Gäste des seligen Festivals Mitte Europa in Jodditz die Ehre. Mit Emil Frantisek Burians viertem Streichquartett steigen sie arst nachdenklich suchend, dann wie gereizt, pulsierend ins Programm ein. Ein werk der Neuen Sachlichkeit, in dem Tonalität und Atonalität verschwimmen: Voll einmütiger Hingebung schlüsseln sie detailiert den Geschehnisreichtum der vier dicht komponierten Teile auf.

Als souveräner Primarius gibt Frrantišek Souček den Ton an, den sein Violinnachbar Petr Střížek tatkräftig aufnimmt; Bratscher Petr Holman tritt auch schon mal mit Achtung gebietenden Soli hervor; und für Vladimír Fortin bietet jede Cello-Phrase Gelegenheit zu abgeklärten Genuss. In grimmigen Aktionismus wie in Tiefsinn stossen sie vor. Die fr¨hliche Liedhaftigkeit des zwiten Satzes durchkreuzen sie grell und unheimlich, bis sie sich im dritten zum Veitstanz steigern. Am Ende des druckvollen Fiinales kehren sie mit gedämpft schillernden Kla¨ngen zum Schluss des Kopfsatzes zurück: schwebende Weltabkehr.

Umso inniger wenden sie sich dem Diesseits in Antonín Dvořáks 13. Quartett zu. Vierzehn Quartette schrieb der Böhme insgesamt, doch erfeut sich ausserhalb Tschechiens nur eines, das "amerikanische" (opus 97), angemessener Berühmtheit; vor zwei Jahren spielte es das Ensemble in Joditz. Das Helmbrechtser Publikkum bekommt es also gleich wieder mit einer Rarität zu tun. Fast vierzig Minuten lang darf es die Musiker bei der Formung empfindlicher und rustikaler Affekte beobachten. Die Künstler entfalten sie während sorgsam entwickelter 'Ubegänge, aber ebenso mittels kräftiger Kontraste; und sogar durch Stille, während tiefer Pausen. Dunkel tönen die vier das Adagio, das sie mit durchdachtem, schönem Ernst als Widerspruch zum ersten Staz und als Hauptereignis des ganzen Werks inszenieren. Kummervoll durchziehen sie das - quirlig frech anhebende - finale mit einer stark verlangsamten Elegie. Zum Leben, das der Komponist !sehend und wissend bejaht" (Jarmil Burgghauser), gehören Verzicht, ungewissheit und Leid eben auch.

Den schlimmsten Schicksalsschlag, der einen Komponisten treffen kann, ertrug Bedřich Smetana: Sein Gehör nahm dramatisch Schaden und machte den Tauben zum Leidensgenossen Beethovens und Onslows, Faurés und Vaughan-Williams. Mithin erzählt Smetana in seinem ersten Streichquartett "Aus meinem Leben" keineswegs nur Freudvolles. Aufgeräumt zwar lässt das Zemlinsky-Quartett die Polka des zwiten Satzes zärtlich-innige Liebeslyrik. Grossflächig, vielfarbig leuchtenn die Interpreten, bei gleichbleibend enger Verflochtenheit ihrer Stimmen, die Nuancen des Ausdrucks und der Dynamik aus.

Aber schon den ersten Akkord des ersten Satzes entfesseln sie wie einen Aufschrei. Und die kernige Vergnügtheit des Finales durchbohrt Primarius Souček, nach tiefer Zäsur, schneidend mit dem höchsten Ton des Abends, jenem Tinnitus-Schrillen, das Smetanas Abstieg zum Tiefpunkt markierte, in die Gehörlosigkeit. Ein viergestrichenes e, peinvoll gellend: ein Schmerz, der sich Mitleid Heischend mitteilt, auch nach 140 Jahren noch, auch in Helmbrechts. Doch das Ende ist er nicht: Dorthin gelangt das Zemlinsky-Quartett mit den stillen Gebärden einer duldsamen Weisheit, die gewiss über die Kraft der meisten Menschen geht.

Michael Thumser

back to top
Penrith
22.2.2016, (English)

Penrith Music Club

From Prague to Penrith the Zemlinsky String Quartet brought a musical offering of the highest quality that made a deep impression on a large and appreciative audience. Formed in 1992 the Quartet clearly follows in the long Czech tradition of fine string quartets produced by this small, musical nation. Previous Penrith recitals by the Kocian and Martinu Quartets were memorable but this programme of Haydn, Janacek and Dvorak surpassed all expectations.

Haydn’s Emperor Quartet exhibited all the qualities of an experienced and highly gifted team – a cohesive quartet sound, effortless ensemble yet great individuality on the part of each player. It is often a misnomer to label the first violin as the quartet leader; in this case each player took equal responsibility, each a primus inter pares – a recipe for great music making. Refined tone and phrasing characterised the Haydn from beginning to end; the variations on the Emperor’s Hymn came over with calm solemnity and the finale sparkled with wit.

Janacek’s Quartet no.2 (Intimate Letters) is an extraordinary confession of infatuation – passionate, turbulent and heart-on-sleeve music spilling out in fragmented bursts. The complexity of the score presented no problems to the Zemlinsky Quartet who gave a revelatory performance. Petr Holman, the violist, frequently turned to face the audience at moments of significance in the viola part – a somewhat histrionic but effective ploy to ensure we did not miss his vital contribution! Czech quartets seem to have a special affinity with Janacek’s music so it was a privilege to hear this high octane performance of a unique musical voice from 1928.

The same might be said of Dvorak and his Quartet in G op.106. Again in their element the Zemlinsky Quartet displayed a variety of tone colours and dynamic contrasts that enlivened Dvorak at his most inspired. The heart of the work is the weighty Adagio – a soulful journey around one theme of great tenderness, probably expressing his contentment at being home in Prague after years away in America. Dvorak’s great melodic and harmonic gifts were relished by each player as one ingenious variation followed another – from still moments of calm to the extrovert climax of an almost orchestral level of intensity. The other movements delight with Czech dance rhythms and folk melodies. In the first the Quartet impressed with their expressive use of tempo variation, always with easy unanimity – the sign of experience. In the Scherzo the energy of Dvorak’s catchy accompaniments woke everyone up; the contrasting lyrical moods were managed with consummate charm and the finale danced with an infectious rhythmic spring. When Dvorak breaks off to reflect by reintroducing the nostalgic theme from the first movement the players drew particularly sensitive, hushed tones for their strings before launching into the jubilant coda.

J.U.

back to top
Villingen-Schwenningen Gepflegte Streichkultur auf hohem Niveau
Schwarzwälder-Bote, 29.01.2016

Schwarzwälder-Bote
Von Siegfried Kouba VS-Villingen. Das Zemlinsky-Quartet gastierte im Franziskaner-Konzerthaus mit großem Erfolg. Die Vorstellung hätte durchaus mehr Publikum verdient gehabt, denn ausgezeichnete Qualität wurde geboten.

Frantisek Soucek, Petr Strizek (Violinen), Petr Holman (Viola) und Vladimir Fortin (Violoncello) gelang die Symbiose von akademischer Kunstfertigkeit und ursprünglichem, tschechischem Musikantentum.

Das Ergebnis war gepflegte Streichkultur auf hohem Niveau mit gefühlvoller Herzlichkeit, ohne in banales Sentiment abzugleiten. Insgesamt beeindruckte das Klanggefüge, die musikalische Ansprache und die stilsichere Interpretation unterschiedlicher Werke. Tschechische Komponisten standen auf dem Programm, das mit Franz Xaver Richters Streichquartett op. 5 Nr. 1 seiner sechs derartigen Werke eröffnet wurde.

Schon beim Eingangssatz wurde der Zuhörer von eleganter Vorklassik umschmeichelt, war der ausgeklügelte, aufeinander abgestimmte Bogenstrich und der angenehm-weiche Klang der Instrumente deutlich, um alles zu einem Guss zu formen.

Die Gleichberechtigung der Partner wurde besonders beim Adante poco bei klanglicher Feinabstimmung spürbar. Zu einem wetteifernden Presto gelang das "Zusammentreffen" des Finales – dynamisch, motorisch, schwungvoll, mit großer Musizierfreude. "Intime Briefe" übermittelte das Zemlinsky-Quartet mit dem Streichquartett Nr. 2 von Leos Janacek. Der reife Komponist, wie Richter Mähre, bekannte: "Jetzt habe ich begonnen, etwas Schönes zu schreiben". Die innere Erregung eines Menschen, der im Jahre der Uraufführung des Werkes starb und von Zuneigung zu einer jungen Frau beflügelt wurde, schuf für sich und die Nachwelt ein von traditionellen Formen abgewandten Quartett. Rondoartig wurden die langsamen Sätze umrahmt, alle Teile lebten aus einer reichhaltigen Melodienvielfalt, verspielten Momenten, fiebriger Gemütsbewegung und prägenden Solopassagen der einzelnen Instrumente, wobei die Bratsche eine Sonderrolle zugewiesen bekam. Die quasi programmatische Anlage gipfelte im finalen Allegro, das gestrichen und gezupft einen jubelnden Tanz vollzog, um im rätselhaft klirrendem Flirren endete. Zum krönenden Schluss: Dvoraks G-Dur-Streichquartett. Den vier Musikern gelang es, die kompositorische Größe heraus zu stellen, den Inhalt von Böhmens Hain und Flur, kombiniert mit den Erfahrungen aus der neuen Welt sowie der teils grüblerischen Empfindung des Schöpfers, seine innere Zufriedenheit und seine hymnischen Gedanken zu transportieren.

Die Formvollendung des Zemlinsky-Quartets wurde schließlich im Finalsatz des "amerikanischen" als Pendant zum "böhmischen Quartett" dokumentiert: Rhythmische Rasse, empfindsames Zusammenwirken, Steigerungsfähigkeit, bewundernswerte Technik und konzentrierte Wiedergabe vom ersten bis zum letzten Ton. Das Publikum war eisern: Als zweite Zugabe wurde eine Barcarole als Gute-Nacht-Gruß geboten.

back to top
Alles klar mit Haydn
Bensheim, 11. 4. 2015, Bergsträßer Anzeiger
Kammerkonzert – Das Zemlinsky-Quartett braucht nicht viel für maximalen Einklang
Ein Programm ohne „Kracher“ so zu gestalten, dass gleich der ganze Abend ein „Kracher“ wird: Diese Kunst hat das Zemlinsky-Quartett am Samstag bei den Kunstfreunden Bensheim gezeigt.

BENSHEIM. Im Parktheater spielen die Prager zwei tschechische Quartette, die es nie in die Klassik-Charts geschafft haben. Zuvor aber genügt eine gute Viertelstunde Josef Haydn, um dem Publikum die beruhigende Gewissheit zu vermitteln: Das hat sich gelohnt.

Ahnungsvolles Raunen geht beim „Reiterquartett“ flugs über in explizites Tanzen und Springen; der erhabene Tonfall weicht plötzlich einem von Haydns geliebten Effekten, für die er nicht viel mehr braucht als aufmerksame Zuhörer. Auch im Finale bleibt beim souveränen Zusammenspiel jederzeit klar, wer was macht und wohin der Weg alle vier führt. Das gilt – ausgenommen ausgerechnet die Schlusstakte – auch für Josef Suks erstes Streichquartett. Präzision und organische Gestaltung erfahren jeweils die gleiche Pflege, und das ist allein dafür wichtig, damit das Stück nicht an der Fülle des Wohllauts zugrunde geht. Immerhin bietet es die rechte Bühne, auf der vier schöne Stimmen um die Wette singen können, die zudem das Zeug haben, jederzeit zum Chor anzuschwellen.

Aus all dem folgt, dass die abschließende Aufführung von Antonín Dvoráks letztem Streichquartett zugleich Höhepunkt des bejubelten Abends sein muss. Selbst wer nichts auf böhmische Musiker-Klischees gibt, kommt nicht umhin, den Einklang von Schwung und Süße zu preisen. Das geht auch beim späten Dvorák, dem liebreizende Melodien und Folkloristik nicht mehr wichtig waren.

In dieser Saison haben die Kunstfreunde Bensheim diesem Komponisten viel Raum gegeben, der regelmäßig mit überzeugenden Interpretationen gefüllt wird. Schon beim nächsten Bensheimer Konzert am 9. Mai gibt es ein kurzes Wiederhören mit dem tschechischen Nationalmusiker.


back to top
Prager Zemlinsky-Quartett mit begeistemdem Auftritt im Parktheater

Dvořáks Schwiegersohn als Entdeckung

Bensheim, 11. 4. 2015, Darmstädter Echo (German)

Bensheim. Vor allem auf heimischem Repertoireterrain sind die vier Musiker des 1994 gegründeten Prager Zemlinsky-Quartetts eine Klasse für sich. Ihre Janáček und Dvořák Darbietungen beim Saison-finale 2010 2010 im Parktheater zähleten zu den Höhepunkten in der Konzertreihe der Bensheimer Kunstfreunde. Das lang erwartete zweite Gastspiel des nach dem Kompoisten Alexander Zemlinsky benannten Ensembles knüpfte nahtlos an den damaligen Auftritt an - natürlich wieder mit einem schier obligatorischen Klassiker von Dvořák im Gepäck.
Als besondere Überraschung hatten František Souček (1. Violine), Petr Střížek (2.Violine), Petr Holman (Viola) und Vladimír Fortin (Violoncello) das kaum je aufgeführte erste Streichquartett des wenig bekannten Dvořák-Schwiegersohnes Josef Suk (1874-1935) mitgebracht.

Als perfekt harmonierendes Team präsentierten sich die Prager schon in Haydns spätem g-mollQuartett opus 74/3, dessen charakteristisches Kolorit in den spritzig pulsierenden Ecksätzen besonders delikat herauskam. Das durch erlesene Primarius-Soli gekrönte E-Dur-Largo geriet zum kaum klangschöner und ausdrucksinniger vorstellbaren lyrischen Juwel.

Suks 1896 entstandenes B-Dur-Streichquartett opus 11 gehörte zu den attraktivsten Entdeckungen, die man bei den Kunstreunde-Konzerten je machen konnte. Vor allem der rhapsodisch beseelte Kopfsatz und das opulent gesteigerte Adagio liessen aufhorchen: Hier zeigte sich, dass Suk bereits mit 22 Jahren gerade harmonisch weitous moderner unterwegs war als sein grosser Lehrer und späterer Schwiegervater Dvořák.

Eingängiges Kabinettstück Das eingängige Intermezzo-Kabinettstück und der buntscheckige Finalsatz wirkten zwar insgesamt konventioneller, verrieten aber dennoch auf Schritt und Tritt die Handschrift eines frühreifen Meisters.

So jung jedenfalls haben seder Dvořák noch Haydn Vergleichbares produziert. Das Zamlinsky-Quartett warb für diese wertvolle Rarität mit grandioser Klangsinnlichkeit, untrüglichem Stilgefühl, feinstem Detailversändnis und - nicht zuletzt - bewegender Herzensvärme. Eine absolut exemplarische Suk-Interpretation, welche den Komponisten ebenso leidenschaftlich wie intelligent vom hrtnäckigen Verdacht blosser Dvořák-Nachahmung befreite.

Dvořáks Quartettkunst als gleichsam natürlichste musikalische Sache der Welt, sagenhaft geschliffen umgesetzt und dabei doch stets erfrischend spontan anmutend: So magisch erlebte man nach der Pause das Wunderbare G-Dur-Spätwerk opus 106, das übrigens ebenfalls 1896 uraufgeführt wurde.

Spielerisches Temperament und poetische sensibilität waren in dieser prachtvoll organischen Wiedergabe ideal vereint.

Ihre kaum überbietbare Dvořák-Kompetenz unterstrichen die vom Bensheimer Publikum gefeierten Gäste auch mit dem zündend zugegebenen "Allegro assai" - Finale aus dem 1879 komponierten Es-Dur-Quartett opus 51.

Klaus Ross


back to top
Wigmore Hall, London, 28. 12. 2014, Financial Times

This anniversary concert offered plenty of virtuosic playing but not much risk-taking if you can’t let your hair down at your own party, then when can you? There’s a question for the Zemlinsky Quartet, who concluded their 20th-anniversary celebrations with this Wigmore Hall concert on Sunday. From the opening bars of Haydn’s “Rider” String Quartet in G minor to the elegiac encore by Suk, the performance lacked neither polish nor delicacy. But what these Czech players didn’t always manage to convey was a sense of spontaneity, or give the impression that they might actually be enjoying themselves.

The exception to this was second violinist Petr Střížek, who eclipsed stony-faced first violinist František Souček with his enthusiasm. Any genuine joyfulness emanating from Haydn’s cantering quartet was down largely to Střížek’s performance. The others offered carefully balanced phrases, weightless bow-technique and a timbre devoid of jagged edges. But a byproduct was a reluctance to take risks.

A similar shortcoming marked Janáček’s Second String Quartet, “Intimate Letters”, a work that thrives on that very capacity for risk-taking. Although we heard plenty of virtuosic playing and sharp contrast, it sounded neat and preprogrammed, not raw, heady, or quasi-improvisational — three of the work’s defining characteristics. The second movement’s biting juxtapositions lacked freedom of expression. And the whole lacked the intensity of that reckless, relentless passion — namely the composer’s unrequited love for the married Kamila Stösslová — which provides the engine of this piece.

So it was good to hear the players relax into Dvořák’s “American” String Quartet in F, and to hear them fully capture the work’s sense of lyricism and propulsion. The first movement had just the right balance of optimism and yearning, with no recourse to artificial sweeteners. The third movement stood out for its rhythmic malleability. Still, some vital ingredients were missing: a sufficiently luxuriant cello tone for the heartbreaking second movement, a violist willing to make the most of the spotlight in the work’s final bars. The players sounded more invested than they had done throughout the concert’s first half, but I sensed they could still raise the temperature a few notches.

Hannah Nepil

back to top
Malvern Concert Club Review 27 November 2014

There was something for everyone in the Zemlinsky Quartet’s concert for Malvern Concert Club on 27 November. Although an authentically Czech ensemble, they take their name from the Austrian composer, Alexander Zemlinsky, whose Quartet No. 3 from 1924 formed the centrepiece of their programme. This piece explores some unusual string sonorities, and in this darkly expressive performance the atonal harmony (redolent of early Schoenberg or Berg) and the fragmentary melodic language all made perfect sense. Only in the finale did the mood lighten, brief references to Bohemian dances hinting at what was to follow, Dvořák’s Quartet No. 10 (Op. 51). Here was airiness and light, the slow, ‘Dumka’ movement floating gently along with just a hint of Slavic nostalgia. After much applause and stamping of feet, we were treated to two encores, including Elgar’s Elegy dedicated to the memory of the Club’s former secretary, Catherine Freeman.

The enjoyment of music-making is evident in everything these musicians play, and each is an exemplary performer. I confess to being captivated from the first bar of Beethoven’s ‘first’ quartet (Op.18, No.1): the elegant shaping of the phrases and the perfect balance, ensemble and tuning together promised a concert as magnificent as it turned out to be.

Congratulations to the Concert Club for bringing these wonderful musicians to Malvern – let’s hope they come again soon.

Peter Johnson

back to top
Schloss Eggenberg:"styriarte"-Matinee (Kronenzeitnung)
SO KLINGT DAS PARADIES


Zur letzten "styriarte"-Matinee 2014 in Eggenberg erklang ungarisch inspirierte und original ungarische Kammermusik. Das tschechische Zemlinsky Quartett gab Strichquartette von Haydn und Bartók in souveräner, farbkräftiger Manier; für Brahms Klarinettenquintett stiess der Deutsche Sebastian Manz dazu.

Nich graziös tänzelnd, sondern forsch, mit erdigen Bögen ging das Zamlinsky Quartett den ersten Satz aus dem "Reiteerquartett" op. 74/3. an - Haydns "ungarischestem" Werk für die Besetzung. Das Largo assai durchschritt es feierlich bewegt wie einen Trauermarsch, das Menuett nahm es lieber mit spröden, ungelenken Spitzbögen, als es höfisch-elegant erscheinen zu lassen. Hier dominierte sozusagen die östliche, folkloristische Perspektive auf den !Wahl-Ungarn" Haydn.

Doch war bei aller Kraft des Zugriffs kein Deut koketter Grobheit im Spiel von František Souček und Petr Střížek (Geigen) sowie Petr Holman (Bratsche) und Vladimír Fortin (Cello). Auch nicht in Bartóks zweitem Quartett von 1917, dessen frei- bis atonalen Expressionismus sie überaus mit elegischer Tiefe, synchronem Atem und fulminant sauberer Intonation.

Im Allegro von Brahms Klarinettenquintett machten energische, scharf umrissene Tutti und Generalpausen gehörigen Eindruck. Transzendent blühend versank Sebastian Manz' Klarinette in einer wahrhaft paradiesischen Klangfülle, bevor sie sich im behutsamst gedehnten Adagio blumengleich um gedämpfte Streicher rankte, im Dialog mit einer weltentrückten, zierlichen Primgeige.

Matthias Wagner

back to top
Posted on November 25, 2012
Vinehall School, 24 November 2012


It is always good to hear Czech music played by Czech musicians, and when they are as internationally recognised as the Zemlinsky Quartet the event is bound to be prestigious.

Janacek’s second quartet, Intimate Letters, requires rapid changes of mood and dynamic without any sense of rawness. The warmth of the playing, and in particular the vibrancy of Petr Holman’s viola, made for elegant transitions and a level of geniality which is often missed. The final movement danced joyously even when there are undercurrents of tension and concern. It is not often that music can be considered happy, but Dvorak’s second quartet, known as the American, seems to be just that. The players were certainly happy not only with their performance but with the work itself, often playing from memory and deep commitment. In the context of the Janacek quartet, Dvorak’s Molto vivace seems to pre-echo the younger composer in the deft mood changes and snatches of melody. The lilting dance of the final Vivace was enchanting.

These Czech works were sandwiched between two baroque pieces. The evening opened with Mozart’s quartet No17 K458. The playful final movement seems to hint at the more familiar Eine kleine nachtmusik while the inner movements range from a Haydnesque Trio to a romantic Adagio.

As an encore we heard the final movement of the third quartet by Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga,The Spanish Mozart.

It may have been a nasty night outside but in the hall all was warmth and comfort – and a tribute to the organisers who can tempt this quality of performance to the wilds of East Sussex.BH



back to top